dezzoi:

Lammergeier/Bearded vulture w/ griffon vulture in the BG
dezzoi:

Lammergeier/Bearded vulture w/ griffon vulture in the BG

dezzoi:

Lammergeier/Bearded vulture w/ griffon vulture in the BG

(Source: birdpictures.pro)

(Source: verbalairways)

awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.
awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.
photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.

awkwardsituationist:

brazil’s yacare caiman was once hunted to near extinction for its valuable skin, but thanks to a global ban on the trade, its home in the pantanal — the world’s largest wetland, situated along along the paraguay river — now supports the world’s largest population of crocodiles. the caiman, however, face new threats: deforestation, dams, tourism, mining and seaport development.

photos by luciano candisani, who notes that the caiman are neither aggressive nor fearful but, for the most part, approachable - especially when busy with the shoal fish seen here in the pantanal’s shallow, murky waters.

(Source: avocreaming)

doughdeer:

BUNNY BOI

photo by kafei white, taken at luna park

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/4.5
  3. Exposure: 1/2500th
  4. Focal Length: 50mm
"All the hardest, coldest people you meet,
were once as soft as water.
And that’s the tragedy of living."
— Iain S. Thomas (via poetisch)

(Source: theonlymagicleftisart)

itsalwaystimeforhorror:

Lección de anatomía

artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet] artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet] artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet] artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet] artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]

artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)

Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.

The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]

robotmango:

gooqueen:

every year after you turn 17 you get further away from being the age of the dancing queen and that’s my least favorite thing about growing up

ah but when you turn 34 you’re two dancing queens and thus having twice the time of your life. and at 51 you become the dancing triumvirate and three golden crowns are forged in your honor

lots to look forward to